Back to the Future

Back to the Future

APRIL 15 & 18

One of the most popular films of the 1980's, this time-travel comedy directed by Robert Zemeckis stars Michael J. Fox as average American teenager Marty McFly.  Through a chance encounter with mad scientist Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd), Marty finds himself transported to the year 1955 with no means to get "back to the future."  Their time machine is a plutonium-powered DeLorean car.  ("Roads?  Where we're going, we don't need roads!")

1985

Rated PG

Wayne's World

Wayne's World

APRIL 22 & 25

“Party on!” with Wayne (Mike Myers) and Garth (Dana Carvey) in this highly quotable 90’s comedy about two slackers with their own cable access show (“Excellent!”). This most successful of all movies based on Saturday Night Live sketches (“Schwing!”) co-stars Tia Carrere (“She’s magically babelicious”). The Bohemian Rhapsody scene is a classic, as is the one where Wayne and Garth meet their idol Alice Cooper. (“We’re not worthy, we’re not worthy!”)

1992

Rated PG-13

The Notebook

The Notebook

APRIL 29 & MAY 2

Grab the Kleenex for this touching romance (and fan favorite) based on the novel by Nicholas Sparks. Framed as a story told by a man (James Garner) to a woman (Gena Rowlands) about young lovers living in the 1940’s. Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams won critical acclaim for their break-out performances as the young couple whose relationship is tested by war and class distinctions.  (“I wrote you 365 letters…I wrote you every day for a year…”)

2004

Rated PG-13

MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL

MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL

MAY 6 & 9

British Comedy troupe Monty Python applies its unique brand of off-the-wall humor to the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table.  The actors play multiple parts, with Graham Chapman (“I am Arthur, King of the Britons!”), Terry Gilliam as the Bridgekeeper (“What…is your quest?”), Eric Idle as the Dead Collector (“Hang on, he says he’s not dead!”), and John Cleese as the incredibly determined Black Knight.  (“It’s just a flesh wound!”)

1975

Rated PG

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

MAY 13 & 16

“The hills are alive” with the sound of the most popular musical of all time and the winner of 5 Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Julie Andrews is governess to the seven rambunctious children of Captain von Trapp (Christopher Plummer). Shot on location in Austria, the majestic Alps look awesome on the big screen and the unforgettable score by Rodgers and Hammerstein is full of favorite tunes. ("Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens...”) 

1965

Rated G

CLUELESS

CLUELESS

MAY 20 & 23

A classic 90’s comedy about a “way-normal” teenager (Alicia Silverstone) growing up beautiful, popular and rich in Beverly Hills.  She doesn’t date high school boys (“As IF!”) and hasn’t learned to park (“What’s the point? Everywhere you go has valet.”). Ex-stepbrother Paul Rudd is “kind of a Baldwin.” Hailed by critics as funny and smart, with dialogue that is way-quotable. ("He does dress better than I do…what would I bring to the relationship?”)

1995

Rated PG-13

GREASE

GREASE

MAY 27 & 30

Grease is STILL the word! Join John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John and the rest of the gang at Rydell High in the original high school musical, looking better than ever in a 4K Digital restoration. With a dynamite score (the album went multi-multi-platinum) that includes “Summer Nights,” “Greased Lightnin’,” “Beauty School Dropout” (performed by real life 50’s heart-throb Frankie Avalon) and “You’re the One That I Want.” (“I’ve got chills…they’re multiplying…”)

1978

Rated PG

THE PRINCESS BRIDE

THE PRINCESS BRIDE

JUNE 3 & 6

A cult classic and maybe the most quotable comedy ever made. The dashing Westley (Cary Elwes) is intent on rescuing the lovely Buttercup (Robin Wright) from an unhappy fate as the bride of Prince Humperdinck (Chris Sarandon).  Mandy Patinkin is a fencing master (“My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.”) and Billy Crystal is Miracle Max, a medicine man with a talent for treating the “mostly dead.” (“Have fun storming the castle!”) 

1987

Rated PG

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER

SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER

APRIL 8 & 11

The blockbuster that made John Travolta a star (and disco music a phenomenon) returns in a digitally restored director’s cut. The dazzling dance floor action (set to chart-topping songs from the Bee Gees) looks better than ever on the big screen. Travolta earned an Oscar nomination for his performance as Tony Manero, whose streetwise demeanor hides his yearning for a better life.   ("I'll dance with you, but it's not like you're my dream girl or nothin'.”)

1977

Rated R

EASTER PARADE

EASTER PARADE

APRIL 1 & 4

Judy Garland and Fred Astaire, two of the greatest stars from Hollywood’s Golden Age, team up in this joyous holiday musical from composer Irving Berlin (White Christmas). One of the most successful of all MGM musicals, with some of Berlin’s best songs, including “Shakin’ the Blues Away” (performed by Ann Miller), “Steppin’ Out with My Baby,” “A Couple of Swells” and, of course, the title song.  ("Oh, I could write a sonnet about your Easter bonnet…”)

1948

The Dark Crystal

The Dark Crystal

MARCH 25 & 28

This fantasy adventure from legendary puppeteers Jim Henson and Frank Oz is a cult favorite. In a magical world ruled by an evil race (the “Skeksis”) it falls to the elf-like Jen, a “Gelfling,” to challenge their power. Groundbreaking in its use of animatronics, it paved the way for Henson and Oz’s collaboration on Labyrinth. The Skeksis dinner scene is a classic combination of artistry and humor…you’ll believe these puppets are real.   ("Ah, roast Nebrie, my favorite!")

1982

Rated PG

Sunset Boulevard

Sunset Boulevard

MARCH 18 & 21

Billy Wilder directed what may be the best movie about movies ever made. A down-on-his-luck screenwriter (William Holden) becomes involved with Norma Desmond (Gloria Swanson), a former silent film star clinging to past glory.  Nominated for 11 Oscars ®, and winner for screenplay, cinematography and score. Cecil B. DeMille plays himself as the director with whom Desmond hopes to stage a comeback. (“All right, Mr. DeMille, I’m ready for my closeup.”)

1950

The Quiet Man

The Quiet Man

MARCH 11 & 14

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day. This classic love story set in Ireland earned director John Ford his fourth Academy Award. John Wayne plays a former American boxer who falls in love with fiery redhead Maureen O’Hara, but her obstinate brother (Victor McLaglen) stands in their way.  Wayne and McLaglen come to blows in a rousing climax peppered with witty trash talk and grudging respect. ("Your widow—me sister—she could’ve done a lot worse.”)

1952

Rated G

The Godfather

The Godfather

MARCH 4 & 7

Director Francis Ford Coppola turned Mario Puzo’s best-selling novel about a fictional crime family into an epic.  Winner of 3 Oscars® including Best Picture, this movie revived the career of Marlon Brando, who was named Best Actor as Don Vito Corleone.  Al Pacino, James Caan, and Robert Duvall all received nominations for their performances.  Contains some of the most famous quotes in movie history. ("I’m gonna make him an offer he can’t refuse.”)

1972

Rated R

True Grit

True Grit

FEBRUARY 25 & 28

John Wayne won an Academy Award® for his performance as Rooster Cogburn, a fearless one-eyed U.S. marshal who never knew a dry day in his life. Glen Campbell plays a Texas Ranger thirsty for bounty money. And Kim Darby is a teenage girl out to avenge her father’s death.  She doesn’t care what they are, or who they are, as long as they have “true grit.”   ("You’ve not heard the last of Mattie Ross. You may well hear from my lawyer, Daggett.")

1969

Rated G

The Wizard of Oz

The Wizard of Oz

FEBRUARY 18 & 21

Follow the yellow brick road with Dorothy, Scarecrow, Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion in this classic musical from Hollywood's Golden Age. Based on the children's book by L. Frank Baum, this groundbreaking Technicolor production won an Oscar® for best original song for Over the Rainbow. With Judy Garland in her star-making role and Margaret Hamilton as the Wicked Witch of the West.  ("I’ll get you, my pretty…and your little dog too!")

1939

Rated PG

Casablanca

Casablanca

FEBRUARY 11 & 14 (VALENTINE’S DAY)

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with one of the most romantic movies ever.  This World War II drama and  Best Picture Oscar® winner stars Humphrey Bogart as a cynical cafe owner who is more of a romantic than he lets on.  When long-lost love Ingrid Bergman shows up in Casablanca, sparks fly. Claude Rains is Captain Renault, whose approach to law enforcement is, well, flexible. (“I’m shocked, SHOCKED, to find that gambling is going on in here.”)

1943

Rated PG

Gigi

Gigi

FEBRUARY 4 & 7

Winner of 9 Academy Awards® (the most for any musical), including Best Picture. Lerner and Loewe, the team that created My Fair Lady, collaborated on this romance set in Paris at the turn of the 20th century. Leslie Caron is the high-spirited Gigi and Louis Jourdan is the jaded aristocrat who falls for her. Maurice Chevalier and Hermione Gingold perform a memorable duet in a movie filled with hummable songs.  (“Ah, yes…I remember it well.”)

1958

Rated G

Gone with the Wind

Gone with the Wind

JANUARY 28 & 31

This epic love story set against the backdrop of the Civil War received 10 Academy Awards® including Best Picture and Best Supporting Actress (Hattie McDaniel).  Vivien Leigh won Best Actress for her classic portrayal of Scarlett O’Hara, who goes from carefree southern belle (“Fiddle-dee-dee!”) to indomitable heroine (“Tomorrow…is another day!”). Clark Gable plays Rhett Butler, the charming rogue who pursues her. (“Frankly, my dear…”)

1939

Rated G

ALIEN

ALIEN

JANUARY 21 & 24

The ORIGINAL, from director Ridley Scott, about a spaceship stalked by an alien creature with a serious attitude. It’s the perfect blend of science fiction and horror (“In space no one can hear you scream”). Sigourney Weaver, in a star-making role, plays Lieutenant Ripley: tough as nails and with a healthy skepticism about taking extraterrestrial remains back to earth.  (“This thing bled acid. Who knows what it's gonna do when it's dead.”)

1979

Rated R